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and conservative jews will, if i could use a very crass term, hold their part of the market. they'll decline relatively simply because of their great growth of black protestants and hispanics, some catholics, some protestants. but there aren't very big cohort moves. the people who are now moderate and liberal and black protestants are not in the surge towards fundamentalism. hard core fundamentalism, i don't think has as much future as moderate evangelicals and the pentecostals. i think that's where the future is. it's pretty hard to stay hardcore fundamentalist in america. there are so many lures out there and to build rather thick walls is frustrating. it will remain around, but i would watch much more for the exuberant groups black pentecostal, white pentecostal and moderate evangelical. [interviewer:] okay, one of the difficulties people come uwith when we talk about religious diversity and a classroom religious pluralism there's a tendency to say, "well, if you study all the religions, you water down your own religion." is there a way that a model or technique people might use, to cheri
eastern religions to help us understand the experiential dimension. a very interesting class last time on hinduism - some chanting, we talked to a leader of the hare krishna temple about religious experience, achman and brahman being one, the sense of connectedness, working through many different lives, reincarnation in order to find moksha, to find peace. and in this class, we're going to look at buddhism, which believe me, folks we'll be asking buddhism to help us understand the religious experience. but it's an even more fascinating set of answers to profound life questions. maybe one of the most perplexing for the eastern mind is buddhism, and we're going to be going through that today. but to make that all - important segue between hinduism and buddhism, which of course the segue in history is the buddha himself who makes that connection, one of our top students here, janet, was not here last week because she was in a hindu retreat, and i thought i'd ask janet - i know you were there. i'd like to, first of all, get you to do the chant you learned, and tell us a little bit, then, a
leaping off point for us for looking at religious experience, which is what we're going to do in this class. but first, i know you had a lot of questions and a lot of interesting comments, and i'm particularly interested in your feedback on the religion process, how you see it holding forth. you haven't had a lot of time to think about it, but any questions or comments you'd like to make? >> before self-consciousness in man, isn't there something more primal, something innate in man that reaches out to the other, even before he becomes self-conscious about anything around him? >> give me an example. that's a good point. >> well, say, an uneducated man, that he would see the sun, and then when we looks around, and he thinks, "that's something other than what's around here; that must be something importan" >> i'm glad you brought that up, because self-consciousness is a difficult term and it may mean different things to different people. i think i'm saying something more along the line of what you're saying, that whenever it happened - 50,000 years ago, 100,000 years ago - the f
around us that seems bent on our creating our own demise? our sojourn through the wide, cool halls of the egyptian museum in cairo dramatically reinforces our three interrelated introductory class themes. rites of passage - in this case death - generate boundary questions - "where do i go when i die?" which is a pervasive human preoccupation from our most ancient civilizations up to the present. if nothing else, our mortality is the commonality that binds humanity together, and forces us to formulate religious answers to the sometimes overwhelming demands of our shared existence. faced with death, as are we all, the ancient egyptian pharaohs responded with unparalleled creative energy in their quest for immortality - from the magnificent statuary, elaborate burial masks, to the golden sarcophagus from tutankhamen's tomb, the visitor is struck by the egyptian response to death. of course, for most people, the pyramids of giza are ancient egypt. through the burial tombs for three pharaohs - a father, son, grandson trio who reigned during the 26th century before the common era - an eg
i guess we could use it - not lying, not cheating, not stealing... they say chastity, but we can get back to that one later - i think they're talking about moderation there. and in other words - let me give you a modern spin on that, just real quickly, on those kinds of things. if you think of not stealing, and not killing and these kinds of things as prohibitions, i don't think you've even begun to make the ethical understanding. and i like to think of a very common term in the psychological world as manipulation. if you're a person that's given to manipulating other people, that's when you're in- that you look at life like "i'm the center, and anything i can get for myself is okay." once you're there, then you can steal, you can cheat. cheating amazes me, because some say that 90 percent of students in college cheat. you can only cheat if you are in that mode that says you're the center of the universe and you can get something for yourself. so all these prohibitions actually come out of wrong mind set to begin with. yeah, go ahead, janet. >> and this is where the sexual misconduct
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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